Nassau Paradise Island

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Combining Spanish, West African and British tastes and styles, Bahamian cuisine is delightfully different and deliciously satisfying. Fresh seafood is often the main course on the menu, while variations on native ingredients like pigeon peas, potatoes, rice and tropical fruits make for delectable sides. “Go local” and take a culinary journey of The Bahamas in Nassau Paradise Island!

  • A distant cousin to the American lobster, the Bahamian rock lobster is quite different in many aspects
    BAHAMIAN ROCK LOBSTER

    A distant cousin to the American lobster, the Bahamian rock lobster is quite different in many aspects. It doesn’t have the large front claws that American lobsters have, and its shell has hard spines covering it for protection; perhaps that’s why it’s commonly referred to as “the spiny lobster.” However, it is like its American cousin in one respect: Bahamian rock lobster is delicious—especially when it’s been broiled, minced or used in a fresh salad.

  • With so many coconut trees in abundance in Nassau Paradise Island, it’s no wonder that coconut commonly appears on a Bahamian menu
    COCONUT

    With so many coconut trees in abundance in Nassau Paradise Island, it’s no wonder that coconut commonly appears on a Bahamian menu, particularly when it comes to desserts. You’ll often see coconut in cakes, custards, ice cream and tarts, as well as in puddings and pies. Of course coconuts are also used for serving up refreshing beverages like coconut water and coconut milk—as well as drinks that may be just a little bit stronger in content!

  • Unlike the somewhat slippery oyster, conch meat is firm and white
    CONCH

    Seafood lovers can appreciate the Bahamian fondness for conch (pronounced “konk”). Unlike the somewhat slippery oyster, conch meat is firm and white—and as one of the most popular foods in The Bahamas, local restaurants have found delectable ways to serve it. Conch may be prepared raw with lime juice, as conch salad with tomatoes, peppers and onions, and added to other dishes such as soups and salads. There’s also deep-fried conch fritters and cracked conch (a fried dish that’s a bit like fried calamari). In fact, conch can be found in some form or another at just about every traditional restaurant in The Bahamas.

  • With such a variety of fruit trees in The Bahamas, tropical fruits feature prominently in many local dishes.
    TROPICAL FRUITS

    With such a variety of fruit trees in The Bahamas, tropical fruits feature prominently in many local dishes. Guavas are often used to make “duff”—a dessert where the guava is folded into a mixture of dough, boiled and then served with a sauce—while fresh mangos, tamarind, soursop, sapodilla, melons and passion fruits make for a tasty treat any time of the day.